Dharamshala: With the combined stresses of paying for materials, finding a workspace, and balancing one’s personal interests with audience appeal, being an artist is never a profession for the faint of heart.  But to survive as an artist, while simultaneously holding a status as a Tibetan refugee in India?  Doing so would surely be incredibly difficult, if not impossible.  Nevertheless, in McLeod Ganj of Upper Dharamshala, a small community of artists is doing just this, with the help of Tashi Gyatso’s Peak Art Gallery.

Dharamshala: Like many I came to McLeod Ganj to help the Tibetan's-in-exile, I arrived expecting to work in the construction industry, as that is my occupation back home. Instead I was lucky enough to be asked to volunteer at The Tibet Post to write articles. I was also lucky, in that I formed a friendship with a young Tibetan man. I asked if I could write his story, but he has taken the initiative and has written it himself, and I much prefer it like this. It is real. It is titled "My Story".


Dharamshala: CHOICE HIV/AIDS Initiative, since its inception in April 2007, had conducted over 11O workshops in various Tibetan settlements and dwellings including Tibetan refugee camps, schools, colleges, Institutions, Non-Governmental Organizations(NGOs), monasteries, nunneries, , sweater sellers, hospital, CTA staff, SFF army personals, and the PLHA (People living with HIV/AIDS).

Dharamshala: A new documentary about the life of blind Tibetan musician Acho Namgyal received its world premiere on February 20 at the Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts, Dharamsala, India. Director Sonam Tashi spent two years filming in the US, Switzerland and India to tell the story Acho Namgyal and the roots of the Nangma and Toeshey genres of Tibetan classical music.

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