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Tibet: News in Focus It was in Tibet’s interest to remain part of China: His Holiness to Al Jazeera

It was in Tibet’s interest to remain part of China: His Holiness to Al Jazeera

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Dalai-Lama-Dharamsala-India-TibetDharamshala — His Holiness the Dalai Lama on Tuesday said Tibet was "not seeking separation" from China, but instead it was in Tibet's interest to remain part of China because of the material benefits this brought to the Himalayan region.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama, participated online in an episode of 'The Stream', a social media community with its own daily TV show on Al Jazeera English during his second day dialogue with youth leaders of the United Nation's Institute of Peace, USIP.

Tibet was "not seeking separation" from China, but was instead "very much committed to remain within People's Republic of China, provided they give us certain rights, mentioned in the Chinese constitution" and those be "fully implemented on spot."

"We respect Chinese people, historical and cultured, hardworking people. Now today, as matter of fact, it is the most populated nation and over 2000 years, China and Tibet had very close relationship through marriage," His Holiness said.

"We are not seeing independence, separation, (from China) inspite of past history, we always look at today's reality and I am one of the person who really admire spirit of European Union so China," he told the Al Jazeera.

"We are very much committed to remain within People's Republic of China, provided they should give us certain right, mentioned in Chinese constitution, should be implemented fully on spot," said the spiritual leader of Tibet.

"So we usually call the Middle Way Approach, not seeking separation but not satisfied with existing policy or situation," the Nobel Peace laureate told the TV channel.

A correspondent from Lebanon wanted to know what challenges His Holiness had faced as a refugee. "It was quite confusing at first," he replied, "but fortunately we have long had close connections with India. With the support of the people and government of India, as well as help from other friends across the world. We've been able to look after ourselves."

"Most important, we have kept alive the knowledge that has been part of our tradition for more than a thousand years—and now we are able to share what is relevant in it with our brothers and sisters across the world."

The 82-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate says he has pursued a "middle way Approach" in which he simply seeks "genuine autonomy" for the people of Tibet within China or within the framework of the Chinese constitution, rather than press for full independence.

The series of negotiations between envoys of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Chinese government officials broke down in November 2008, after Chinese officials strongly rejected a proposal for "genuine autonomy" presented to them.

In 1959, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama along with thousands of others escaped to India, where he was given political asylum. The spiritual leader has set up a government and rebuilt monasteries where masters pass on their teachings to young monks. Tibetans in exile have succeeded in gradually rebuilding their monasteries, preserving their culture and restructuring their society and keeping it alive, in spite of the extremely difficult circumstances.

For his part, the Tibetan spiritual leader travels around the world spreading a message of Peace and Universal Responsibility. He believes that the common aim of all religions, an aim that everyone must try to find, is to foster tolerance, altruism and love. He retired from politics in 2011. But, as one among six million Tibetans, His Holiness said he will continue to serve the cause of Tibet.

Tibet was invaded by the Communist regime in China, starting in 1949. Since that time, over 1.2 million out of six Tibetans died as a direct result of China's invasion and continued occupation of Tibet, over 6000 monasteries have been looted and destroyed— Crimes against Humanity and Genocide include murder, massacres, torture, rape, starvation, extreme deprivation, forced marches, enslavement, brutal violence, and systematic extermination. The communist regime continues to call this a 'peaceful liberation', that the "Tibetans are living in a Maoist socialist paradise."

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 08 November 2017 20:59 )  


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