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Tibet-China-US-2015Georgia, U.S. 'There will certainly be a major breakthrough,' former envoy of His Holiness the Dalai Lama said, adding "The Tibet struggle is much more than slogans."

As part of the 15th annual Tibet Week held at Emory University, a panel was held Monday 23 March 2015, titled, The China-Tibet Dialogue and its Implication for International Conflict Resolution: A Conversation with Lodi Gyari Rinpoche and Dr Paul Zwier, the Emory Wheel reported.

Lodi Rinpoche was the former principle envoy of His Holiness the Dalai Lama who conducted nine rounds of high level talks with Chinese Leadership (2002-2010) and led an extensive behind the scene diplomatic effort to sustain the process, expand the channels of communication, build trust with Chinese leadership and maintain broad international interest in the dialogue process. He resigned from the post of lead negotiator on May 2012.

Despite fallouts in negotiations between China and Tibet, Gyari Rinpoche said he believed that ultimately, "there will certainly be a major breakthrough." However, the issue, he added, is not about the Dalai Lama's relationship with China, but rather about the Tibetan people's relationship with China.

A lot of informal talks have shown that "there was serious discussion [about Tibet] among the Chinese leadership" in the past two decades that Rinpoche has been His Holiness the Dalai Lama's envoy to the U.S., he said.

"The Tibet struggle is much more than slogans," the keynote speaker Lodi Gyari Rinpoche said. "[It's about the] preservation of the distinctive cultural heritage of Tibetan people, that actually defines us as Tibetan."

Emory held the first Tibet Week in 2001 to improve the relationship between the University and Tibet.

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