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Dharamshala — Buddhist temples and monasteries in Tibet must become propaganda centers for the ruling Communist Party, where monks and nuns learn to "revere" science and appreciate the party's love, the top Chinese appointed cadre said.

Dharamshala — Buddhist temples and monasteries in Tibet must become propaganda centers for the ruling Communist Party, where monks and nuns learn to "revere" science and appreciate the party's love, the top Chinese appointed cadre said.

Writing in the influential fortnightly party magazine Qiushi, the top Communist Party cadre Chen Quanguo said the more than 1,700 temples and monasteries and 46,000 monks and nuns had to be seen by the government as "friends".

"Let the monks and nuns in the temples and monasteries have a personal feeling of the party and government's care and warmth; let them feel the party's benevolence, listen to the party's words and follow the party's path," Chen wrote in Qiushi, which means "seeking truth".

Chen called for temples and monasteries in the region to be outfitted with radios and televisions, as well as newspapers and reading rooms.

"Monks and nuns should not have to go out of their temples or monasteries to understand the party and government's policies and social progress, or Tibet's peace, stability and good fortune, so as to be guided to follow a path of revering scientific culture."

He has struck a similar line before, writing in late 2013 that Chinese officials in Tibet must build an "impenetrable defense" against separatism and befriend monks and nuns, who are generally revered by the devoutly Buddhist Tibetans.

The government has tried, with varying degrees of failed policies, to prevent Tibetans from accessing information about His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the exiled government on the Internet or via satellite television.

The top party cadre's claiming of befriend is the funniest political joke of the PRC, a state known as one of the most repressive regimes in the world. Because almost all freedom have been prevented in most parts of Tibet, lines of army trucks appeared on the streets, each filled with soldiers, facing to the outside of the truck, machine gun in hand, just hunting for a peaceful man to begin a peaceful protest.

It's already been 66 years since the Chinese regime invaded the independent state in 1949. With a population of more than 1.2 million Tibetans have been killed by the Chinese between 1949 and 1979, including 173,221 Tibetans died after being tortured in prison, 156,758 were executed, 432,705 were killed fighting Chinese soldiers, 342,970 starved to death, and 92,731 were publicly tortured to death, whilst a further 9,002 Tibetans committed suicide, the region has turned into the focal point of the Tibetans' resistance against the relentless Chinese acts of aggressions and continuous occupation.

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